Lawrence Fine Art

Name : Edward Loyal Field
Biography :

1856-1914

1911

Edward Loyal Field, a tonalist landscape painter and etcher, was born in Galesbury, Illinois. He was a student at the Academie Julian in Paris, and debuted as an exhibitor at the National Academy of Design in 1887. He submitted artworks regularly until 1911, with titles that reflect trips to the Catskills and a deep affinity for pastoral, often autumnal, scenery. In 1899 he became a member of the Salmagundi Club, and was awarded the Inness Prize and the Shaw Prize at the club’s 1904 and 1905 exhibitions, respectively.

Like his well known colleague John Francis Murphy, Field focused on landscapes notable primarily for their commonplace features, often adding a figure or a cottage for bucolic effect. Rarely, though, does Field’s work evolve into Wyant’s sometime murkiness or Murphy’s minimalism. One of the most prominent traits of Field’s work is a strongly focused light on a clump of trees or a small section of the landscape, giving an otherwise undramatic scene an element of drama and a distinct sense of temporality.

Field’s work can be found in the Columbus (Ohio) Museum of Art, The Butler Museum of American Art, the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, the Holyoke Museum, the Jersey City Museum, and the Nutley (N.J.) Museum.

Housed in beautiful period frame. Has been professionally conserved.

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